Aging With Canines

Often times, when we think about dogs and special populations of people, our thoughts turn to infants or small children. Certainly I have written and podcasted about a variety of kid and dog issues.*

Pat Miller, trainer extraordinaire, has an article in the January 2019 Whole Dog Journal called Spending the Golden Years with Dogs.** She addresses the pluses of owning a dog in your senior years as well as important points to remember about how much canines can cost, and how critical it is to make the right choice about the type of dog you adopt.

Some of the positive points she makes:

You will likely be home more. In retirement, most people have more time to spend with friends, family, and dogs. This is a grand time to have a dog. If you are an active soul who loves to walk and hike, how much more will you enjoy it with an enthusiastic canine?

You might travel more together. Have you ever considered a motor home to see the country? This is a great way to have your dog come with you without worrying if relatives will welcome your dog, or if you can find a dog-friendly hotel.

Keeping a canine companion for company is good for you! Increasingly, retirement and assisted-living communities not only allow, but welcome pets as they recognize the importance of companionship to mental and physical health.

She does caution the following:

Providing proper care for dogs can be costly. Retirees are likely to be on a fixed income and can limit the amount someone feels he or she can spend on a pet. Pet insurance can help with some of the medical costs (especially for catastrophic illnesses or injuries), but keep in mind that pets require regular vet visits and medications such as heart worm and flea/tick preventatives.

Seniors must be sure, more than ever before in their lives, to make good adoption choices. I thought this was one of the most important points she made in the whole article. If you are 68 years old and have recently lost your 14 year old Golden Retriever, you may be tempted to get another Golden. You have had them all your life and they are your breed. Think, however, about the fact that you were 54 when you last got a puppy. Are you really, truly, up for the challenges of an energetic youngster? Can you lift a large dog into the car if injured or sick? Perhaps it is time to consider a medium size dog, and/or a middle-aged or senior dog at the shelter who needs a home and can offer you 6-8 years of loving companionship. Think seriously about what you can and cannot do, and choose wisely grasshopper.

Ms Miller goes on to address training tips and equipment that might make life easier and safer for everyone involved. Included are tips on leashes, harnesses, treat delivery systems, and training.

She also includes a section on Caring For Your Dog After You’re Gone. It is important to recognize that your dog may outlive you and you need to make provisions for his health and well being. She outlines various strategies, including setting up a pet trust, providing for your dog in your will, and/or making a written agreement with a someone you trust to love and care for you pet when you are gone. I know from personal experience that it is very easy to have a clause put in your will for your dogs. I have had one in my will for over 20 years. Having recently updated my will, I can attest that a good lawyer will not laugh at you, but respect you for caring so completely for those who cannot care for themselves.

But for now, as I seem to be careening towards my senior years, I am happy to hike, travel, and cuddle with my canine BFF, and I look forward to many happy dog years ahead! I wish the same for all of you!

Cuddling puppies in Alaska!

*Click here to see my blogs on kids and dogs; and here to go to Your Family Dog Podcast, where we have several episodes on kids and dogs.

**Unfortunately, you need to be a subscriber to access the full article, but here is the link nevertheless: Spending the Golden Years with Dogs

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