Decompression is not just for divers…

Reisner Veterinary Behavior & Consulting Services is located in Pennsylvania and is headed up by Illana Reisner, a board certified Veterinary Animal Behaviorist. There are only 50 (or so) of this highly trained professionals in the nation and we are lucky to have one of them Dr. Meghan Herron at OSU. Dr. Herron studied under Illana Reisner for her post-graduate work. Dr. Reisner also spoke at the Midwestern Veterinary Conference in 2012 and her knowledge, compassion, and dedication to the health and well being of dogs (and cats) is deep, broad, and inspiring. I highly recommend that if you are on Facebook and interested in animal welfare and behavior (and want some great tips for successfully managing your pets), like Reisner Veterinary Behavior & Consulting Services and look for their Tuesday’a Pearl posts as well as their Saturday’s Pet Peeve. You will become a better owner! Here is a recent example:

Tuesday’s Pearl: If you don’t know your dog well – if he was recently rescued, for example — don’t push his limits with uncomfortable (to him) interactions. Many behavior clients call about recently rescued adult dogs showing unexpected aggression towards them, and are surprised because the dog behaved appropriately when they first met.
          This is usually because a stressed and unattached dog in a noisy environment will act differently from one who’s lived in your home for a few months. It may take the dog a while to settle into the social rhythms of his new home and relationships. For a newly adopted adult dog, kissing, hugging and snuggling (especially while they are lying down) is confusing at best, and certainly not automatically positive.
           In fact, the dog probably wonders why his owner isn’t getting the message to stop – after all, he is looking away, licking lips, yawning,  even rolling on his back. When owners persist and rub that belly or hazard kissing it, the dog may bite – this is a common scenario with adult rescues who are bewildered by all of it. It is safest and least stressful for both dog and human to avoid “in-your-face” interactions with an adult rescue, and instead focus on walking, training and just hanging out near each other.
In other words, recognizing when your dog needs some space to decompress from events he finds stressful will help ensure the health and well being of everyone, human and canine.
Liplicking, when not waiting for dinner, is another indication that the dog is uncomfortable and needs some space!

Liplicking, when not waiting for dinner, is another indication that the dog is uncomfortable and needs some space!

I caused how much trouble?

Avoiding eye contact = stressed

Yawning can be a displacement behavior and it is one way a dog tells you he is uncomfortable, stressed, or needs some space.

Yawning can be a displacement behavior and it is one way a dog tells you he is uncomfortable, stressed, or needs some space.

There are many other displacement or stress signals that your dog may be exhibiting. If you have any concerns about your dog’s behavior, then contact a positive reinforcement trainer who can help you to better read your dog’s body language and to interact with him in a healthy and positive way.

Behavior or "What the heck?" Stress: signals, management, & warning signs

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